The Resource Aspects of the novel, E. M. Forster

Aspects of the novel, E. M. Forster

Label
Aspects of the novel
Title
Aspects of the novel
Statement of responsibility
E. M. Forster
Creator
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
Sponsored by Trinity College of the University of Cambridge, The Clark Lectures have a long and distinguished history and have featured remarks by some of England's most important literary minds: Leslie Stephen, T. S. Eliot, F. R. Leavis, William Epsom, and I. A. Richards. All have given celebrated and widely influential talks as featured keynote speakers.n important milestone came in 1927 when, for the first time, a novelist was invited to speak: E.M. Forster had recently published his masterpiece, A Passage to India, and rose to the occasion, delivering eight spirited and penetrating lectures on the novel.The decision to accept the lectureship was a difficult one for Forster. He had deeply ambivalent feelings about the use of criticism. Although suspecting that criticism was somewhat antithetical to creation, and upset by the thought that time spent on the lectures took away from his own work, Forster accepted. His talks were witty and informal, and consisted of sharp penetrating bursts of insight rather than overly-methodical analysis. In short, they were a great success. Gathered and published later as Aspects of the Novel, the ideas articulated in his lectures would gain widespread recognition and currency in twentieth century criticism. Of all of the insights contained within Aspects of the Novel, none has been more influential or widely discussed than Forster's discussion of "flat" and "round" characters. So familiar by now as to seem commonplace, Forster's distinction is meant to categorize the different qualities of characters in literature and examine the purposes to which they are put. Still, it would be wrong to reduce this book to its most famous line of argument and enquiry. Aspects of the Novel also discusses the difference between story and plot, the characteristics of prophetic fiction, and narrative chronology. Throughout, Forster draws on his extensive readings in English, French, and Russian literature, and discusses his ideas in reference to such figures as Joyce, Tolstoy, Dostoevsky, James, Sterne, Defoe, and Proust
Member of
Cataloging source
Midwest
http://bibfra.me/vocab/lite/collectionName
hoopla (Digital media service)
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
1879-1970
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Forster, E. M.
Dewey number
808.3
Index
no index present
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
dictionaries
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
English fiction
Target audience
adult
Label
Aspects of the novel, E. M. Forster
Link
Instantiates
Publication
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier.
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent.
Control code
MWT11334856
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource.
Form of item
  • online
  • electronic
Governing access note
Digital content provided by hoopla
Isbn
9780795311567
Isbn Type
(electronic bk.)
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia.
Media type code
  • c
Publisher number
MWT11334856
Specific material designation
remote
Stock number
11334856
System details
Mode of access: World Wide Web
Label
Aspects of the novel, E. M. Forster
Link
Publication
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier.
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent.
Control code
MWT11334856
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource.
Form of item
  • online
  • electronic
Governing access note
Digital content provided by hoopla
Isbn
9780795311567
Isbn Type
(electronic bk.)
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia.
Media type code
  • c
Publisher number
MWT11334856
Specific material designation
remote
Stock number
11334856
System details
Mode of access: World Wide Web

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